Nonferrous waste as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing
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Nonferrous waste as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Zinc -- Metallurgy.,
  • Nonferrous metal industries -- Waste products.,
  • Zinc plating.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 20.

Statementby E.R. Cole, Jr., M. Dattilo, and T.J. O"Keefe.
SeriesReport of investigations ;, 9125, Report of investigations (United States. Bureau of Mines) ;, 9125.
ContributionsDattilo, M., O"Keefe, T. J.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTN23 .U43 no. 9125, TN796 .U43 no. 9125
The Physical Object
Paginationii, 20 p. :
Number of Pages20
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2493225M
LC Control Number87600148

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Electrogalvanizing using zinc recovered from nonferrous smelter dusts and other values from waste products and thus promote the wise and efficient use of the resources of the U.S.A. In line with this objective, Bureau researchers are investigating the use of waste products containing zinc as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing. Cited by: 2. Nonferrous waste as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing / By E. R. (Ernest R.) Cole, T. J. (Thomas J.) O'Keefe and M. (Marion) Dattilo Abstract. Nonferrous waste as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing. By. (contract h) investigated the use of nonferrous flue dust with varying zn contents (11 to 66 pct) as a source of zn for electrogalvanizing steel wire. The waste dusts used were from a secondary cu smelter, a brass smelter, a pb smelter, and a water treatment plant. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Read, borrow, and discover more than 3M books for free.

Electrogalvanizing is a process in which a layer of zinc is bonded to steel in order to protect against process involves electroplating, running a current of electricity through a saline/zinc solution with a zinc anode and steel conductor. Zinc electroplating maintains a dominant position among other electroplating process options, based upon electroplated tonnage per annum. From October through September , researchers at the Bureau and at the University of Missouri--Rolla (contract h) investigated the use of nonferrous flue dust with varying zn contents (11 to 66 pct) as a source of zn for electrogalvanizing steel wire. The waste dusts used were from a secondary cu smelter, a brass smelter, a pb. Bureau of Mines recycling research devises technology that enables the recovery of metals, minerals, and other values from waste products and thus promotes the wise and efficient use of resources. Bureau researchers are investigating the use of waste products containing zinc as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing.   Cole ER, Dattilo M, O'Keefe TJ () Nonferrous waste as a source of zinc for electrogalvanizing. US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines Google Scholar Creamer NJ, Baxter-Plant VS, Henderson J, Potter M, Macaskie LE () Palladium and gold removal and recovery from precious metal solutions and electronic scrap leachates by.

  The waste source of zinc was brass smelter flue dust. Corrosion rates were measured by Tafel line extrapolation and the polarization resistance technique. Values of the Tafel slopes and the corrosion currents were also compared with those for pure zinc (%). Zinc, a crystalline metal with moderate strength and ductility, is seldom used alone except as a coating. In addition to its metal and alloy forms, zinc also extends the life of other materials such as steel (by hot dipping or electrogalvanizing), rubber and plastics (as an aging inhibitor), and wood (in paints). Hot-dip galvanization is a form of is the process of coating iron and steel with zinc, which alloys with the surface of the base metal when immersing the metal in a bath of molten zinc at a temperature of around °C ( °F). When exposed to the atmosphere, the pure zinc (Zn) reacts with oxygen (O 2) to form zinc oxide (), which further reacts with carbon dioxide (CO 2.   Waste treatment in zinc plating. A discussion started in but continuing through Q. We're having trouble producing a true solid from our waste treatment of electrozinc rinsewaters. We have a typical chemical precipitation process. Our sludge is too wet, more of a slurry at times. We have tried alum and lime. No major improvements.